This week was the first competitive roll over for MikesBikes which was extremely daunting. During this week a problem I experienced was that I wasn’t being an effective follower. Kelly (1988, p. 144) states that an effective follower is someone who possess 4 qualities including; good self-management, commitment to the organisation and purpose, focus of their efforts and building competency, as well as being trustworthy and courageous. I wasn’t being an effective follower as I wasn’t practicing good self-management because I turned up to the meeting without looking at reports or with a game plan on what to do with my role this week. This meant I had to spend time looking at the reports to formulate a plan for my role during our meeting, which wasted some valuable time.

 

By analysing my past behaviour, I know that I am not used to group work, especially group work that is every week where team members are constantly relying on me to produce ideas for my area of work. I am used to working by myself at my own pace where some tasks take longer for me to tackle an understanding of. I don’t feel settled into my role with a comprehensive understanding on what needs to be done each week (i.e what a reasonable amount to increase advertising by). As a result, I have been relying on the help of the CEO and other team members instead of coming up with my own ideas beforehand.

 

After analysing my problem and reading this week’s readings, I came to theory that in order to be able to self-manage to be an effective follower, I need to begin to practice ‘self-leadership.’ Pearce and Manz (2005) suggest that all members of a group or firm are able to lead themselves to some extent. “While self-leadership involves managing one’s behaviour to meet existing standards and objectives, it also includes evaluating the standards, and setting or modifying them.” (Pearce & Manz, 2005, p. 133). I believe by taking on the practice of self-leadership I can ensure that my job as a team member and role will be fulfilled.

 

Therefore, my action is to practice self-leadership. I am doing this by considering the standards that our group has set (i.e being prepared for each roll over), and then creating my own standards for my role and what work needs to be done each week. After creating my own standards (i.e maximum amount of effort contributed and organisation) for my work I created a plan to follow each week to achieve these standards. This plan is to go over and analyse the relevant reports and data (i.e market summary or responsiveness to media channels) every Tuesday. From this I will create a draft plan for what I think should occur in the week for my role (i.e outlining how much should be spent on the different media channels and why). I will then be prepared and ready to share these ideas with the group during the meeting. I believe that by following this plan every week I will become settled into my role and have a better understanding of what needs to be done. As a result, hopefully I will be able to work efficiently, effectively and manage my work well.  

 

 

 

 

Kelley, R. E. (1988). In Praise of Followers. Harvard Business Review, 66(6), 142-148. 

 

Pearce, C. L. & Manz, C. C. (2005). The new silver bullets of leadership: The importance of self and shared leadership in knowledge work.  Organizational Dynamics, 34(2), 130-140. Retrieved from https://www-sciencedirect-com.ezproxy.auckland.ac.nz/science/article/pii/S0090261605000148?via%3Dihub