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The last couple of journals I wrote were dedicated to the lack of commitment my team had in regards to turning up to team meetings. This week saw a massive improvement, and although it was encouraging that everyone turned up, our latest rollover result did not at all align with the time and effort we put in as a team this week. The problem I faced this week was understanding and coming to terms with why our SHV barely rose. From the outset, my first impression of seeing our latest rollover result we received was “How? I don’t get what we’re doing wrong?!” 

In relation to the readings this week, Davenport (2006) alludes to the idea that an organization’s source of strength include the right balance with: people, culture, structure and most importantly focus. I believe this closely relates to the problem I faced this week and provides insight as to why things did not go our way. Although we were all there in class, a factor that could have caused us to slip up may have been the disrupted focus we had as a team. Considering we had not physically been in contact in a while, the awkward tension of team members could have caused a slip in the balance that may have been needed. In all honesty, as I reflect over this week I feel a sense of disappointment lingering at the back of my mind as I align our current SHV with the grade we are currently on. Davenport (2006) goes on to say that reflecting over the actions we make as a team ensures that we can critically analyze and understand the information from each previous rollover at a better level. Although we may not be getting the results we want, we are continuously grasping the idea of Daudelin’s reflection process. Thus, this is something that is definitely worth delving further in. I know that this class hasn’t been a waste of time because I know for sure I have learnt and experienced what it is like working within a team.  

Although there are only a few rollovers left, an action plan for my team and I would to continue to be optimistic about our situation and look at our market, take the time to genuinely analyse surrounding markets and try our best to cohesively decide on ways to execute the most wisest decisions we can.

Sometimes the only way to learn is by making mistakes.      


References

Baghai, M., Smit, S., & Viguerie, P. (2009). Is your growth strategy flying blind? Harvard Business Review, 87(5), 86-96.

 

2 Comments

  1. An interesting read that describes the situation that many of us find ourselves in where you control what you have control over and let the rest go. You can only guide, you cannot control the actions of the group. You have followed Daudelin’s process pretty well by analysing the difficulties you face and then trying to find solutions. Your solutions may not offer the solution that you seek but I think that this week you have gained a valuable insight, sometimes when you lose, you win. 

  2. Hi Davida,

    This journal is an example of a concise and well written reflection. Although you have not explicitly followed the stages of reflection, I enjoy that it does incorporate in depth reflection while incorporating theory. I could relate to your experiences because we have also had a discrepancy in the effort and results received.

    In a previous journal I reviewed, I delved extensively in to how the journal could be improved using four stages of reflection. Your journal is straight to the point and I feel that there is not much to fault. The problem you identified was that you did not have a clear focus so no matter how much time you invested, the result may have not improved much at all. You have identified some realistic actions and sound like your team will continue to work well.

    One thing I have learnt from my group is to always analyse the performance of other firms just as much as we analyse ourselves. Perhaps your group could do the same if you aren't already? You could also try to narrow down your focus by identifying areas that need more of an investment when compared to others.

    Nonetheless, I enjoyed your journal and thank you for the read. Again, your journal was short yet full of impact. Something I am trying to achieve. All the best for your final journal and your summative journal.

    Thanks Davida! :D