Wiki contents

Journals

2019 Learning journals
2018 Learning journals
2015 Learning journals
2014 Learning journals
2013 Learning journals

Smartsims Support Centre

Blog updates

Recently Updated

Recent updates

Recently Updated

All updates

Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

In last weeks journal I talked about having to make an important decision based on how best to coordinate my team and bring together everybody's ideas. Having reflected on different ways to do this I came away with a clear idea of what I needed to do. My plan was for each member to understand his or her role extremely well and for us to use the 'offline' version of Mikes Bikes multiplayer to find the best move for our team for each rollover. This would mean that while we had an 'idea' of the strategy we wanted to follow we would really be basing it week by week on what would give us the best outcome. 

However while parts of this plan are still viable, we no longer have the offline mode and therefore it does not completely stand true anymore. We can no longer go with the flow with a possible idea of a strategy we must make every decision with the big picture in mind. Therefore we must make sure now, more than ever, that we have a clear strategy in place from the very beginning. While I do not want to give away my teams strategy, I have definitely found this weeks readings to come at a perfect time as they have given us great insights into the best way to go about making our strategy and what to focus on.

The 'Blue Ocean Strategy' (Kim & Mauborgne, 2004) reading made the value of creating a new market very clear. However I have struggled with how to implement it most effectively within our team's simulation. The big problems I have found is that the bike market is relatively small and we are directly confined to what the simulation allows. Due to these confinements we cannot do as the reading suggested and create a completely new industry. Instead we must do what the reading suggested as the only other way to create a blue ocean and alter the boundaries of the existing industry. While we are able to do this within the simulation, the only way is to be the first to enter a market and you really need to act as fast as possible. It in fact seems as if it is a race to enter each market first and therefore stake your position.

Another factor I have struggled with is not knowing how well we are going to do from our decisions. Especially as the results of our decisions really don't show until the second rollover after they are made. This means that it is hard to judge from our profits whether our business model is working, as was suggested in 'Why Business Models Matter' (Magretta, 2002). This is terrifying to me (as Peter said last week, we often handle large gaps between action and feedback very badly). Yet is a very good representation of the real world where we would need to wait much longer than 1 week (often years) to know the results of our business decisions. Again this means we must have a solid business strategy and model, which we continually tweak and update.

Looking forward to the coming week my team and I need to continue to work on our business strategy, making sure it has focus, divergence and can produce a compelling tag line (Kim & Mauborgne, 2002). I believe an exercise such as the one suggested in the reading 'Charting your Company's future' where we create a strategy canvas (a visual representation) will definitely benefit us. However unfortunately as we do not know the planned moves of other teams we cannot yet do this and instead will be eagerly awaiting the moves of others to come into play. We must also make sure we have a strong business model which will pass both the numbers and the narrative test (Margretta, 2002). Hopefully after next week's rollover we will begin to see our strategy and model taking form and can continue tweak it and achieve good results throughout the semester.  

Kim, W. C. & Mauborgne, R. (2002). Charting your company's future. Harvard Business Review, 80(6), 76--83

Kim, W. C. & Mauborgne, R. (2004). Blue ocean strategy. Harvard Business Review, 82(10), 75--84

Magretta, J. (2002). Why business models matter. Harvard Business Review, 80(5), 86--92

2 Comments

  1. Thank you for the opportunity to review your learning journal. The main thing of which you have demonstrated learning is reflecting on what went well and didn't in the previous week.  You have also picked out key points within the readings which you struggled with which demonstrates applying this to your own situations in context.

    You have partially followed Daudeline's recommended approach as you have identified two problems and analyzed why these are problems for you. However you have missed steps 3 and 4 in the stages of reflection as you have not formulated a tentative theory for how to fix the problems or chosen a final solution and implemented it.

    The highest level of Bloom's taxonomy demonstrated is Application. This was done when you said 'The Blue Ocean Strategy' (Kim & Mauborgne, 2004) reading made the value of creating a new market very clear. . . big problems I have found is that the bike market is relatively small and we are directly confined to what the simulation allows'.

    One thing you could improve on would be to complete stages 3 and 4 of Daudeline's recommended approach. This would ensure that you are able to apply the knowledge to the new contexts and learn from it in the final stage.

    Thankyou for sharing with me your work, it has helped me by realizing that I need to complete the final 2 stages of Daudeline's approach in order to take full advantage of the reflection process. It has also shown me that I am still at a low level of Bloom's taxonomy and need to work on this in future journals in order to practice and consolidate the skill for later in life. 

  2. Hi Charlotte

    Thank you for the opportunity to review your learning journal. The main thing of which you have demonstrated learning is your ability to reflect on what you have learned in the past and you have articulated the problems well, especially the problem about new markets. You have analysed the problems and formulated theories to solve the problems, i.e. "Instead we must do what the reading suggested as the only other way to create a blue ocean and alter the boundaries of the existing industry" but I don't see evidence of the testing of the solutions, which I guess is down to the fact that you aim to get that done for this week.

    The highest level of Bloom's taxonomy demonstrated in this journal is application, which was shown when your journal said "I believe an exercise such as the one suggested in the reading 'Charting your Company's future' where we create a strategy canvas (a visual representation) will definitely benefit us. However unfortunately as we do not know the planned moves of other teams we cannot yet do this and instead will be eagerly awaiting the moves of others to come into play." This is new because you have taken something used in the business world and applied it to your group situation.

    You can improve by trying to write how how solved your problems because according to Daudelin, this is the fourth stage and this helps to compete the cycle of learning. You could write something like: "I found that by doing x, y occurred and this was because..."

    Thank you Charlotte for sharing your work with me and I think it has shown me that I need to read the articles in a greater depth so I can pick up ideas more effectively. Have a great week!