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As the semester is nearing its end, so is the MikesBikes simulation. Consequently, every decision from here on out is crucial to deciding where we place on the board at the end. With this realisation, my team and I struggled this week due to our loss of motivation. 

For the past 3 rollovers, our team's results were stagnant in the sense that we were still in the same spot on the leaderboard but we were also slowly, but steadily decreasing in SHV. This was the result of us having a solid plan since the beginning of the simulation. Seeing all our planning and hard work end up being the same result each week, we were disheartened and in turn lost some motivation to keep putting in 100% every week. 

However, upon team reflection, we started asking ourselves and the team questions about why we were at our current predicament, what our abilities/skills are and how we are going to change things up. The answers we gained from asking those questions helped to lift up our team morale. It boosted us into the mindset of 'go hard, or go home'. I can now see that as per Brooks & John's Surprise Power of Questions (2018), not asking questions opens up floodgates to missed opportunities and lack of growth. Through us asking those questions, we unlocked the powerful tool of self-questioning in order to learn and grow from prior mistakes. As a result of the answers formed, through seeing what we were capable of, we were motivated more than ever to make the hard decisions we would have otherwise been too afraid to make. 

Our implementation of the lesson we learnt saw us increasing our SHV drastically more than the past three rollovers. It has now given us a confidence booster that, fingers crossed, we can continue to hone and continue to build upon for next week. Going into the future, we will definitely ask more questions to ourselves, and our team. I myself have learnt that sometimes, I need to ask myself the types of questions I would ask others. Only then will I be able to effectively reflect on the decisions I've made by looking at it how I may view others' decisions. As for us as a team, we have now seen the benefits of taking calculated risks and will probably 'go big or go home' for the last few remaining roll overs. 


BROOKS, A. W., & JOHN, L. K. (2018). The Surprising Power of Questions. Harvard Business Review96(3), 60–67. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.auckland.ac.nz/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=129192448&site=ehost-live&scope=site

DAUDELIN, M. W. (1996). Learning from experience through reflection. Organizational Dynamics24(3), 36–48.

2 Comments

  1. Hi Krystal,

    Overall very strong learning journal this week. It is good to see how taking on the approach of Brooks and Johns's power of questioning is helping you and your team learn from prior mistakes. Not only this but it is good to witness how you are employing Daudelin's method for reflection. This, in turn, has allowed you to develop a very promising learning journal that should place you in a powerful position for the summative journal later in October. 

  2. I agree with Caleb, this is quite a well constructed entry. I hope for the sake of your upcoming learning portfolio you are considering how you are going to combine your prior learning journals, this one and future learning journals to craft an overall picture of what you have really learnt throughout the course and how this has developed as the weeks have passed.


    Best of luck for the rest of the sim and the final project