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Ah! The final week for journals has finally come upon us. I have to say, I have a bit of mixed emotions about the end of this course. I am happy that the weekly journal entries are over because they were like medicine for me (taste bad and hard to swallow but good for you). I used to love Fridays, but this semester I have been dreading them! I dreaded them the same way I dreaded taking my giant pills (the size of a mentos) that I constantly need to take when I have tonsillitis. And like all prescriptions of antibiotics, one needs to finish the whole course in order to be fully better in the end. My weekly learning journals have been ‘prickly’ to complete each week, but now I am glad that I did them as they will help me with my summative learning journal. I feel sad that the course has come to an end, as next week is the last time that I will meet with my group members face to face. Like I said last week in my learning journal, we have grown close together as a group and have bonded in a way that has no words to describe it. So alas, tis a bitter-sweet end for MGMT300.

The other thing that I am going to miss about this course, besides my team members, is the Mikes Bikes simulation. This thing has both created moments of furry, anxiety, exhilaration and joy. Comparing our past performance to how we are currently performing has highlighted some things that we as team, wish we knew at the beginning of the simulation. For instance, had we spent more time analyzing our financial reports rather than what other teams were doing, I believe we would have been in a better position than what we are in today. This is not to say we as a team have failed, no, instead we have grown and learnt from our mistakes. The discovery of the new found information has come to us better late than never. I am pleased with my team’s tenacity! We have remained resilient throughout the simulation and with each week that passed by, we have improved, slowly learnt new things and grown academically, together. Greiner’s (1972) reading sums up what we have experienced as a team, in which he states that, “companies fail to see that many clues to their future success lie within their own organizations and their evolving states of development” (p.38). Unlike the managers that Greiner is referring to in the reading, my team and I have succeeded to see that our future success lies within our organization, though we have come to this realization towards the end.

My first week’s journal title read ‘better late than never’ and this statement stands true today, because that is the philosophy that I live by. To give a vivid example of how that can be applied to real life, take for instance two students with bad time management, one hands in the assignment late, one decides not hand one in at all. The student who handed in the assignment late will have the opportunity to have their paper marked and awarded some marks towards their final grade, while the student who did not submit one gets zero, nothing, zilch! Anything above zero is greater therefore better.

 References

Greiner, L. E. (1972). Evolution and revolution as organizations grow. Harvard Business Review, 50(4), 37-46. 

1 Comment

  1. Hello

    I loved your beginning paragraph it gives a tangible visual image and an experience that is relatively common and easy to relate to. Even though you dont like writing journals, you are quite good in writing them. You integrate the reading into the journal and relate it to your concrete experience of your team and this shows a higher level of comprehension. The example of the students is simple and quite smart. I think we all share similar feelings towards the course overall and with that I wish you good luck for the last assessment ahead and well wishes towards all your academic or non academic ventures. 

    Adieu (smile)